Disruptive officials make a mockery of the process

Democrat senators who made a mockery of fairness in disrupting a hearing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh insist they are being denied information they need to decide whether he is qualified.

Not really. Senators have been given many more documents regarding Kavanaugh than were provided for any other high court nominee. How many? At least 482,000 pages of them, according to published reports. Another million or so pages are coming from the National Archives.

Some documents — about 100,000 pages — are being withheld by the White House. They involve Kavanaugh’s tenure there as a lawyer during former President George W. Bush’s administration.

It is not at all unusual for presidents to withhold information about what goes on in the White House. It happens with virtually every chief executive, for the very good reason that disclosing some of what happens there would not be in the national interest.

For example, there can be no reasonable doubt that if Congress requested some documents involving White House counsel under former President Barack Obama, the request would be rejected, with good cause.

Senators have a mountain of information pertinent to Kavanaugh’s qualifications and his philosophy regarding the law and the Constitution.

The document fight, then, is purely political — a delaying action. It needs to end so the Senate can get on with the business of confirming Kavanaugh’s nomination.

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