Racially charged comments have no place, no matter who makes them

Claims opposition to President Barack Obama has racist undertones have become common. But what about when a Democrat operative makes a racially charged comment about a national Republican leader?

According to a published report, Democrat operative Kathy Groob recently used her Twitter account to post this observation about U.S. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.: “Hey Mitch, nothing against you wife and spouses should be off limits; since you mentioned, she isn’t from KY, she is Asian.”

Criticized for the statement, Groob reacted, “Either way, she’s not from KY, she is Asian and Bush openly touted that.”

Kentucky Democrat Party leaders promptly denounced Groob’s action, saying her comments were “abhorrent and have no place in Kentucky politics.”

Such comments are unacceptable – anywhere. But Groob’s reaction after being disavowed by leaders of her own party was interesting. “My sincere apologies for poor choice of words,” she wrote on her Twitter account.

No choice of words is appropriate in making racially charged comments, of course.

Were the situation reversed – with a Democrat leader the target – rest assured the fallout would have gone national. Clearly, there is a double standard at work.

Incidentally, McConnell’s wife is Elaine Chao, who served as U.S. secretary of labor from 2001-09. She was the first American woman of Asian descent ever to serve in the Cabinet, under former President George W. Bush.