Lewistown Borough honors scouts

LEWISTOWN – During a regularly Monday meeting of the Lewistown Borough Council, three Boy Scouts were recognized for receiving highest honor of Eagle Scout.

Lewistown Borough Mayor Deb Bargo said the three scouts at the meeting – Michael Weaver, Quinn Nichols and Elijah Parks – were from Troop 4, a troop with a long standing history not only in the borough, but in the country as a whole.

“A little bit of history on Troop 4, is that they are the oldest charted troop in the entire country,” Bargo said. “These three gentlemen are just three of five who have reached this achievement this year.”

Bargo read a proclamation saying how much of an honor it is to achieve this level of scouting.

“It takes a lot of work and organization to reach this level,” Bargo said. “These men are being honored for all of their hard work not only to achieve this level, but also the work they have put into this overall.”

Bargo continued to say that these men would not have achieved Eagle Scout status if not for the support of their families and the local community.

“The parents need to be recognized just as much as the kids,” she said. “Having the recognition from the community makes the effort worth their time.”

In other meeting business, the council heard complaints from residents living on North Walnut Street about other residents living on the same street. Larry Eddinger, of 156 N. Walnut St., told the council about neighbors, who he claims are a disorderly household.

“I have been on the roof of my garage and have found cigarette butts mixed in with pine needles,” Eddinger said. “I am afraid that my garage, house, trees and other nearby structures will catch on fire.”

A number of other North Walnut Street residents echoed the concerns of Eddinger saying the house constantly has people going in and out, along with being very noisy.

“This winter when the house was boarded up I could still hear the music playing,” Eddinger said. “Every time we call the police the music is immediately turned down. They have been cited but something else needs to be done.”

Lewistown Borough Chief of Police William Herkert told council that he has put Eddinger in contact with the the crime unit.

“This is an ongoing, active investigation,” Herkert said. “We as a department understand that this is a disorderly house, that we are trying to work with Mr. Eddinger to correct this problem, but it is an ongoing problem.”

Both the residents and Herkert said this house has had the same issues with previous residents. The home is a rental property and Herkert said the next step is to get the landlord involved.

“My plan is to have the landlord sit down with myself and (Lewistown Borough Code Enforcement Officer) Rex Fink to discuss what needs to happen with this property,” Herkert said. “We have had to do this with some other properties and it worked with figuring out a solution, but until the three of us sit down and talk we need to just keep a record of what has been going on.”

The council also discussed the possibility of repealing a noise ordinance enacted in September. The Law and Ordinance Committee discussed the need for ambient testing to be done throughout the borough to have a proper noise ordinance in place. Council vice president Matt Moore said once this is done a completely new ordinance will be created.

“Once someone comes in with the proper equipment to test our ambient noise, the new ordinance will be better,” Moore said.

The issue of whether the current noise ordinance should be repealed before the new ordinance is ready to take its place was about to be voted on, but after a long discussion, it was decided to table vote based upon further discussion at a committee meeting.

The council also discussed the possibility of paving projects in the borough. Councilman John Adams gave a report to the other council members saying an official list of projects will be available next month, but at the top of the list is parking lots for the Mifflin County Library main branch. Adams said some of the streets of the in the borough, of which residents have been complaining, are not borough-owned streets.

“An example of one of these streets is Valley Street from Five Points to the borough line,” Adams said. “There are about 12 streets that are owned by PennDOT.”

Adams continued to say that while the borough has no control as to when the state-owned roads are fixed, the council does have a say, but everything has to go through PennDOT, who will also perform the work. He also said the list of streets owned by PennDOT can be found at the borough refuse office.

The Lewistown Borough Council regularly meets at 5:30 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at the borough municipal building.